PhDs in Corporate World

Career talks for PhDs: Olga Pougovkina, PhD

E043 How to Adapt to the Corporate World As a PhD? How to Play the Like a Pro?

Dr. Olga Pougovkina is a scientific leader in the R&D sector of Janssen Biologics where she works within the analytical development for early, late phase and commercial biologics. She obtained her PhD in Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam after which she decided to leave academia. While finishing her PhD she faced the challenges of making career choices and transitioning into industry firsthand. She also soon saw that career development doesn’t stop after getting your dream job as you’re constantly growing further and moving into new directions
This inspired her to start her company Post PhD Career where she gives career development advice to scientists through lectures, workshops and coaching..

Aleksandra Drozd, PhD

E040 From PhD in Physics to Machine Learning Engineer at Facebook. Facebook Jobs for PhDs

Dr. Aleksandra Drozd is a Machine Learning Engineer at Facebook. After her Master’s studies in Physics at the University of Warsaw, she joined International PhD Studies. During her studies, she was a visiting researcher at University of California Davis and University of California Riverside. After her PhD, she joined Theoretical Particle Physics & Cosmology group at King’s College London as a Postdoc. In 2015 she left Physics for Data Science. In the last 5 years, she worked on fraud detection, sports trading, energy trading, and retail analytics.

Chris-Humphrey-Jobs-on-Toast

E039 From PhD in Medieval Studies to Project Management for the Europe’s Largest Sustainable Bank

Dr. Christopher Humphrey holds a BA in English Studies and an MA in Culture and Social Change, both from the University of Southampton. He completed his PhD in Medieval Studies at the University of York in 1997, and held a post-doctoral fellowship there until 2000. Since leaving academia, Chris has worked as a project and program manager in the private sector, specializing in technology, transport, financial services and sustainability. Today, he works as a team leader and project manager for a leading European sustainable bank.
In 2012 Chris founded the website Jobs on Toast as a way to help Masters students and doctoral graduates access the abundant career opportunities available outside of higher education. The popularity of the site is shown by the fact that Jobs on Toast attracts over 40,000 unique visitors a year, as well as having thousands of followers on social media channels including Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

E022 How to Successfully Build Your Impact as a PhD? Parag Mahanti on Networking Through LinkedIn

Dr. Parag Mahanti is a life science professional with experience in life sciences strategy consulting, biotech valuations, and pharmaceutical access/commercialization strategy. Parag received his Ph.D. in Chemistry and Chemical Biology in 2013 from Cornell University where his research was focused on nuclear hormone receptors, steroid signaling, and metabolomics. He then transitioned to a career in management consulting at the IMS Health Consulting Group (now IQVIA) focusing on biotech/pharma strategy projects. Subsequently, Parag was part of an II ranked biotech equity research team at Barclays, where he focused on rare diseases (especially neuromuscular and ophthalmological diseases), gene therapy/editing/cell therapy platforms, and immunology/immuno-oncology companies. Since late 2018, Parag has been at Novartis, focused on strategic planning and operations around pricing and access, and is currently a Director of US Market Access Business Planning. Since 2013, Parag has also been a volunteer for the USA-India Chamber of Commerce in organizing the Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit at Cambridge, MA. Parag continues to be passionate about early stage startups within the healthcare industry and serves as a mentor for the Entrepreneurship Lab (ELABNYC) launched by the New York City Economic Development Corporation to provide mentorship to biotech/health-tech start-ups. Outside of life sciences and biopharma strategy, Parag’s passions include music, both playing and listening, and understanding the evolution of scientific reasoning and leadership skills. Parag takes an active interest in career progression of PhD students to explore and pursue non-academic careers and has participated in multiple career panels at Cornell, Gordon Conferences, Cold Spring Harbor Labs, and NYC-INET. Parag has also created PhD Career Networking Group https://www.linkedin.com/groups/8476427), a fast growing LinkedIn Group to foster career development of PhDs and graduate students which currently has 4,000+ members. In this webinar, Parag told us his story and explained how he made his career decisions so far. He also told us about the origins of the PhD Career Networking Group on LinkedIn and the philosophy behind the group. How to network on LinkedIn? How to look for mentors? How to stay forever young? We touched all these subjects, and many more!

E017 How To Jump From Pharma Industry to Academia? How To Build International Research Projects?

Dr. Jeffrey C. Glennon’s story is very different from typical career stories in academia. After completing his PhD in neurophysiology at University College Dublin, for nearly 10 years, he was working as a pharmacologist in the pharmaceutical industry post-PhD at Solvay Pharmaceuticals. He developed a successful career in this area, but decided to continue his career in academia.

In 2010, he returned to academia in the Netherlands and later in Ireland. Today, he works as a Senior Conway Fellow and Assistant Professor at the University College Dublin. He is a neuroscientist linking experimental psychology to biological mechanisms with a track record in industry and academic settings. His academic interests are in rule making / rule breaking processes in cingulate cortex that govern rational versus emotional decision making. As a translational neuroscientist, he seeks to implement basic and preclinical efforts into clinical practice relevant to patients. On a more fundamental level as an experimental neuropharmacologist interested in disease mechanisms, he has been examining the role of insulin signalling and particularly a class of potassium channels regulating insulin release in relation to behavioral inflexibility.

His interest in cross-disciplinary teams has resulted in the leadership as lead-Principal Investigator of a 5.4 mln Eur Dutch public-private consortium (funded by TI-Pharma) encompassing Dutch universities, university hospitals, and pharmaceutical partners. Further, he has led a 4.5M euro EU Commission FP7 funded consortium (MATRICS) on conduct problems. In addition, he has been involved both as work package leader and partner in six Horizon 2020 / Marie Curie ITN funded / EU Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) II consortia focused on neurodevelopmental disorders, adult psychiatry and psychiatric conditions in neurological and somatic disorders (type I myotonic dystrophy and type II diabetes).

In summary, Jeffrey is an integrator. This pertains to people, research groups, complementary expertise, research ideas, and visions. This ability to integrate across people and topics to create platforms in which they can create new research together. Today, his wide contacts in both academia and industry allow him to build international networks across a range of expertise areas both in academia, in small-medium enterprises (SMEs), and major Pharma. This has led to novel translational treatment opportunities not only in Pharma but also in robotics. On a personal level, he has an innate curiosity over science and people, what motivates them, and how to develop them both as a person and as strong members of productive, effective multi-disciplinary teams.

In this webinar, Jeffrey told us about both his transitions: to the pharmaceutical industry and back. Why did he choose academia after all? What are the pros and cons of this choice? How does he stay positive no matter what? How to create your own opportunities?

Patrick Britz

E011 How Does the Recruitment Process in Biomedical Companies Look? What Recruiters Value in PhDs

Dr. Patrick Britz holds a PhD degree in Biopsychology and worked on combining EEG and fMRI as well as on the interaction of emotion and attention. During his Ph.D., he started working for Brain Products GmbH as a Scientific Consultant and was offered to go to North America to work for Brain Vision LLC. From beginning as a Scientific Consultant, Patrick soon took over more responsibilities and in 2013-2019, was the President of Brain Vision LLC and in 2017-2019 was the President of Brain Vision Solutions Inc. in Canada. Brain Vision LLC provides solutions to the leading institutes, minds, and companies in North America to drive the most innovative research, as the distribution partner for companies of all sizes from academic startup companies to multinational concerns including Brain Products, NIRx, CGX (Cognionics), EasyCap, and CREmedical to name a few.

In this webinar, we will learn what Patrick learned about the recruitment process in the times when he was working as a CEO and President of Brain Vision LLC and he used to review over 200 job applications (mostly, coming from researchers) a year. We will also ask Patrick how he sees his future professional career, and where on the job market are the best opportunities for researchers in his field of expertise.

Since December 2019, Patrick works as the General Manager at NIRx GmbH in Berlin, an international company that provides life science comprehensive technology solutions for the most demanding investigative applications. NIRx GmbH offers a range of products based on multi-distance spectroscopic measurements. Patrick’s role is to drive innovation so that NIRx GmbH can offer the solutions you as a customer want to use in the future. Patrick perfected the art of predicting where the science will go next!

In this webinar, Patrick spilled some beans about the principles of the recruitment process. He acquired this knowledge in the times when he was working as a CEO and President of Brain Vision LLC and he used to review over 200 job applications (mostly, coming from researchers) a year.